From TrialSite News:

At the end of 2020, TrialSite reported that Dr. Andrew Hill was conducting a meta-analysis of ivermectin, sponsored by Unitaid, an organization affiliated with the World Health Organization (WHO). In fact, weeks later, Dr. Hill accompanied Dr. Pierre Kory with the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance to present to the National Institute of Health (NIH) COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel. An internationally influential investigator, Hill’s ivermectin meta-analysis had ivermectin proponents on an emotional roller coast, first with anticipation that a WHO meeting would use the inputs to declare an emergency use authorization, and then with grief that his findings suggested more research. But Dr. Hill’s paper was published recently in the Oxford Academic Open Forum Infectious Disease Journal. Hill’s results for the anti-parasite medication are impressive. They report a 56% reduction in mortality (Relative Risk 0.44 [95%CI 0.25-0.77]; p=0.004; 35/1064 (3%) deaths on ivermectin; 93/1063 (9%) deaths in controls) with favorable clinical recovery and reduced hospitalization. Seems inconceivable that those statistically significant results don’t lead to a more favorable conclusion. But, of course, a substantial number of the underlying studies weren’t peer-reviewed; the standard academic research center protocol forces the need for more clinical trials. This despite the fact that tens of billions spent thus far in the U.S. alone since the pandemic onset, not one early-stage treatment for COVID-19 has been approved, while the death toll from this pandemic mounts. Over 4 million have passed worldwide since the pandemic’s onset, and to this day, nearly 8,000 lose their life on a daily basis as of this writing. TrialSite contends that the market for early-onset, mild-to-moderate SARS-CoV-2 infection is sizable—Blockbuster size. After all, about 90% of the cases fall into this category, and a safe and effective treatment here would be a game-changer.

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Meta-analysis of randomized trials of ivermectin to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection

By Andrew Hill, et al.

Abstract

Ivermectin is an antiparasitic drug being investigated for repurposing against SARS-CoV-2. Ivermectin showed in-vitro activity against SARS-COV-2 at high concentrations. This meta-analysis investigated ivermectin in 24 randomized clinical trials (3328 patients) identified through systematic searches of PUBMED, EMBASE, MedRxiv and trial registries. Ivermectin was associated with reduced inflammatory markers (C-Reactive Protein, d-dimer and ferritin) and faster viral clearance by PCR. Viral clearance was treatment dose- and duration-dependent. In 11 randomized trials of moderate/severe infection, there was a 56% reduction in mortality (Relative Risk 0.44 [95%CI 0.25-0.77]; p=0.004; 35/1064 (3%) deaths on ivermectin; 93/1063 (9%) deaths in controls) with favorable clinical recovery and reduced hospitalization. Many studies included were not peer reviewed and a wide range of doses were evaluated. Currently, WHO recommends the use of ivermectin only inside clinical trials. A network of large clinical trials is in progress to validate the results seen to date.

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